Knife Cuts

Since the day that I talked about making sofrito and threw the brunoise cut in there I have received numerous comments asking what a brunoise is, hence the knife cuts page of my blog.

1.  Tournee cut, this cut uses a specific knife and is kind of a lost “art”.  You will practice this cut on a case of potatoes in culinary school and that’s usually where it stops.  The 3D cut looks like a mini football and has 7 sides.

2.  X-Large dice, 3/4″ cube is the typical cut size for the XL cut and not too common when you go out to eat.  Not a bad size for stock but it is not necessary to cut vegetables this size for a stock.

3.  Large dice, 1/2″ cube and is more common in the kitchen and used as a good vegetable size for entrees.

4.  Medium dice, 1/4″ cube, this cut is very common for soups, you will want your vegetables this size to make sure that they can all fit on the spoon when eating a soup.

5.  Small dice, 1/8″ cube can also be used for soups

6.  Brunoise dice, 1/16″ cube, very small cut used for various dishes, the most common use for me is with shallots.  I put shallots in a lot of my dishes at work and a nice brunoise adds flavor and also makes them subtle.

7.  Rondelle

8.  Paysanne

9.  Batonnet cut, 1/4″x1/4″x1.5″-2″, this cut is typically used with potatoes and carrots or root vegetables to build height or stack them on a plate

10.  Alumette or “Matchstick” cut, 1/8″x1/8″x1.5″-2″, this is a good cut for vegetables as they will cook quickly and not get too limp or overcooked.

11.  Julienne cut, 1/16″x1/16″x1.5″-2″, very common cut in the culinary world and used for a variety of things, especially vegetables.

4 comments

  1. Forgive me but I must disagree on your items, unless the names of 1 through 11 have changed over the years. But I have a classic knife cuts – 3-D model set II, and they are as follows; 1) Tourne 2) Large dice 3) Medium Dice 4) Small dice 5) Brunoise 6) Fine brunoise 7) Rondelle 8) Paysanne 9) Batonnet 10) Julienne 11) Fine julienne. However, all your descriptions are correct. So again, I’m not here to offend or try and correct you but just to be able to pass on the correct information. Thank you, and I very much enjoy cooking your recipes. Keep up the great work.

    1. It is very likely that some of them are mislabeled, the numbers are paired with the cuts on the back of the board, but i will update as needed. Thanks for the feedback, that’s how we make things better!

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